Tag: Spring Boot

When developing Spring Boot applications, you need to tell the Spring Framework where to look for Spring components. Using component scan is one method of asking Spring to detect Spring managed components. Spring needs the information to locate and register all the Spring components with the application context when the application starts. Spring can auto […]Continue reading

Introduction I’m quickly becoming a fan of using CircleCI for CI builds. I’m finding that CircleCI is a very powerful platform. Recently, I configured CircleCI to build a Spring Boot Microservice. The microservice was generated by JHipster. CircleCI is a online resource which uses Docker containers to run your CI builds. Since your build is […]Continue reading

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Spring Data MongoDB has been updated to leverage the reactive programming model introduced in Spring Framework 5. This was followed by support for reactive data access for NoSQL databases, such as MongoDB, Cassandra, and Redis. With the rise in popularity of NoSQL databases, MongoDB has rapidly gained popularity in the enterprise and the Spring community. […]Continue reading

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Recently we’ve seen a rise in popularity of NoSQL databases. MongoDB has rapidly gained popularity in the enterprise and the Spring community. While developing and testing Spring Boot applications with MongoDB as the data store, it is common to use the lightweight Embedded MongoDB rather than running a full-fledged server. As the embedded MongoDB runs […]Continue reading

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Spring Boot makes developing RESTful services ridiculously easy. And using Swagger makes documenting your RESTful services easy. Building a back-end API layer introduces a whole new area of challenges that goes beyond implementing just endpoints. You now have clients which will now be using your API. Your clients will need to know how to interact […]Continue reading

Out of the box, Spring Boot is very easy to use with the H2 Database. Spring programmers typically prefer writing code against such lightweight in-memory database, rather than on an enterprise database server such as Microsoft SQL Server or Oracle. In-memory databases come with several restrictions making them useful only in the development stages in […]Continue reading

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When developing enterprise applications, Spring programmers typically prefer writing data-centric code against a lightweight in-memory database, such as H2 rather than running an enterprise database server such as Oracle, or MySQL. Out of the box, Spring Boot is very easy to use with the H2 Database. In-memory databases are useful in the early development stages […]Continue reading

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Spring Data project provides integration for most of the popular databases around. I have already written few posts to configure Spring Boot to use Oracle, MySQL, and PostgreSQL – all RDBMS widely used in the enterprise. Recently we’ve seen a rise in popularity of NoSQL databases.  MongoDB has rapidly gained popularity in the enterprise and the […]Continue reading

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