Category: Logback

When it comes to logging in enterprise applications, logback makes an excellent choice – it’s simple and fast, has powerful configuration options, and comes with a small memory footprint. I have introduced logback in my introductory post, Logback Introduction: An Enterprise Logging Framework. YAML is just one option you can use for Spring Boot configuration. […]Continue reading

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Logback makes an excellent logging framework for enterprise applications – it’s fast, have simple but powerful configuration options, and comes with a small memory footprint. I introduced logback in my introductory post, Logback Introduction: An Enterprise Logging Framework. In a series of posts on Logback, I’ve also discussed how to configure logback using XML and Groovy. The […]Continue reading

Logback is designed to be faster and have a smaller memory footprint than the other logging frameworks around. If you are new to Logback, you should checkout my introductory post on Logback: Logback Introduction: An Enterprise Logging Framework. Logback supports configuration through XML and Groovy. I explained XML configuration in my previous post, Logback Configuration: using […]Continue reading

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The whole purpose of logging gets defeated when the underlying logging framework becomes a bottleneck. Logging frameworks need to be fast, have a small memory footprint, and easily configurable. Logback is a logging framework with those qualities. If you are new to Logback, I suggest going through my introductory post on Logback: Logback Introduction: An Enterprise […]Continue reading

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Monitoring, diagnosing, and troubleshooting are key activities in any enterprise application lifecycle, and logging is the core part of these activities. Through logging you get to see what the application code is actually doing during these activities at runtime. Using System.out to print messages to the console is simply not sufficient for enterprise applications. Enterprise applications […]Continue reading

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